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Office File Management for Experts

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Without a sensible file-naming strategy and a clear understanding of where and how Office stores files, you'll quickly be overwhelmed by the sheer number of files that Office programs generate. Fortunately, as you'll learn in this sample chapter, Office 2003 integrates well with Windows Explorer, the essential file management tool used throughout the operating system.
This chapter is from the book

In this chapter:

  • What's New in Office 2003
  • Setting Up Office File Storage Locations
  • Managing Files and Folders on a SharePoint Server
  • Creating New Files
  • Using and Customizing Common Dialog Boxes
  • Storing Document Details
  • Searching for Office Files
  • Working with Multiple Files
  • Setting Up Automatic Backup and Recovery Options
  • Troubleshooting
  • Secrets of the Office Masters: Details, Details

What's New in Office 2003

If you want to become an Office master, you need to become an expert in file management. Without a sensible file-naming strategy and a clear understanding of where and how Office stores files, you'll quickly be overwhelmed by the sheer number of files that Office programs generate.

Fortunately, Office 2003 integrates well with Windows Explorer, the essential file management tool used throughout the operating system. The common Open and Save As dialog boxes used throughout Office act like mini-Explorer windows, and unlike in Office XP and Office 2000, the Places Bar at the left of these dialog boxes is identical to the one found in other Windows programs.

Office 2003 makes greater use of task panes than its predecessors. As we explain in this chapter, you use these panels, normally docked at the right side of any Office program, to create new documents and to search for existing documents.

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