Home > Articles > Computer Software > Business Office Software > Desktop Publishing Software > Other

This chapter is from the book

Duplicating Objects

Duplicating objects can be a powerful way of creating geometrical artwork. You can duplicate one or more selected objects by dragging them, using Arrow keys, copying to and pasting from the Clipboard, or using the Offset Path command. When you copy objects to the Clipboard, you can paste them on an artboard several different ways: Paste, Paste in Front, Paste in Back, Paste in Place, or Paste on All Artboards. The Offset Path command duplicates a path (along with fill and stroke attributes) and places it on the artboard based on the offset distance specified in the Offset Path dialog box. The duplicate path is reshaped to fit around the original path.

Duplicate or Copy Objects

yellow_01.jpg Select the Selection tool on the Tools panel.

  • If the object is in a group, select the Direct Selection tool on the Tools panel.
f03il4cs56.jpg

yellow_02.jpg Use any of the following methods:

  • Same Document. Hold down Alt (Win) or Option (Mac), and then drag the edge or fill of the object.
  • Different Documents. Open the documents side by side, and then drag the edge or fill of the object from one document to another.
  • Copy/Paste from Clipboard. Select the object, click the Edit menu, and then click Copy. Click in the target document or artboard, click the Edit menu, and then click Paste, Paste in Front, Paste in Back, Paste in Place, or Paste on All Artboards.
  • Keyboard. Select the object, press Control (Win) or app-alt.jpg (Mac), and then use an Arrow key to move the duplicated object in the direction you want. The duplicate object moves away from the original object based on the current keyboard increment value in General preferences.

Duplicate Objects Using an Offset

yellow_01.jpg Select the Selection tool on the Tools panel.

yellow_02.jpg Select an object.

yellow_03.jpg Click the Object menu, point to Path, and then click Offset Path.

yellow_04.jpg Enter the distance you want to offset the duplicate path from the original object.

yellow_05.jpg Click the Joins list arrow, and then select a bend style: Miter (pointed), Round (circular), or Bevel (square-cornered).

yellow_06.jpg You can set a limit (1-16,000) to determine when a mitered corner changes into a beveled corner. A low number creates a more beveled corner, while a high number creates a sharper corner.

yellow_07.jpg Click OK.

  • + Share This
  • 🔖 Save To Your Account
Adobe Illustrator CS6 on Demand

This chapter is from the book

Adobe Illustrator CS6 on Demand

Discussions

comments powered by Disqus