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Using Your Windows 10 PC If You've Never Used a Computer Before

📄 Contents

  1. Powering Up and Powering Down
  2. Finding Your Way Around Windows
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If you’ve just purchased your first PC, there’s a lot to learn, especially when it comes to using the Windows operating system. This chapter from My Windows 10 Computer for Seniors is for those of you just starting out with your first PC.
This chapter is from the book

In this chapter, you find out how to turn on and start using a new Windows 10 computer.

  • Powering Up and Powering Down
  • Finding Your Way Around Windows

Many people our age have used computers before and have probably owned at least one PC over the years—but not everyone is an experienced computer user. If you’ve just purchased your first PC, there’s a lot to learn—especially when it comes to using the Windows operating system.

This chapter, then, is for those of you just starting out with your first PC. If you’re a more experienced user, feel free to skip ahead to Chapter 4, “Using Your Windows 10 PC—If You’ve Used Windows Before”; otherwise, read on to learn how to get started with your new computer and Windows 10.

Powering Up and Powering Down

If you’ve already read Chapter 1, “Understanding Computer Basics,” you’ve learned how to connect all the components of your new computer system. Now that you have everything connected, it’s time to turn everything on.

Turn On and Configure Your New PC—For the First Time

The first time you power up your new PC, you’re led through an initial setup and configuration process so that you can get Windows ready to use.

  • 1.jpg Turn on your printer, monitor (for a traditional desktop PC), and other powered external peripherals.

  • 2.jpg If you’re using a notebook PC, open the notebook’s case so that you can see the screen and access the keyboard.

  • 3.jpg Press the power or “on” button on your computer. Windows starts up and begins displaying a series of Setup windows and screens.

  • 4.jpg When you see the Here’s the Legal Stuff screen, read Microsoft’s license terms, and then click Accept to proceed. (If you don’t accept the terms, you can’t use Windows!)

  • 5.jpg When you see the Get Going Fast screen, click Use Express Settings. (You can click Customize Settings to configure each setting separately, but the Express Settings work best for most users.)

  • 6.jpg If prompted as to who owns this PC, click I Own It.

  • 7.jpg You are now prompted to enter the username (email address) and password for your Microsoft account. If you do not yet have a Microsoft account, click Create One! and follow the onscreen instructions.
  • 8.jpg If you already have a Microsoft account (for Outlook.com, Hotmail, OneDrive, or another Microsoft service), enter your email address and password, and then click Sign In.

  • 9.jpg You may be prompted to use a personal identification number (PIN) to sign in to your PC rather than a traditional password. This is more secure than entering a password, and may be easier for some people. If you want to do this, click PIN Me! and follow the onscreen instructions. Otherwise, click Skip This Step.

  • 10.jpg If you are prompted to set up Cortana, Windows 10’s virtual personal assistant, click Next and follow the onscreen instructions.

Windows now continues the installation process, sets up your default apps (short for applications), and then displays the desktop.

Turn On Your System—Normally

Each subsequent time you turn on your computer, you go through pretty much the same routine—but without the initial configuration steps.

  • 1.jpg Turn on your printer, monitor (for a traditional desktop PC), and other powered external peripherals.

  • 2.jpg If you’re using a notebook PC, open the notebook’s case so that you can see the screen and access the keyboard.

  • 3.jpg Press the power or “on” button on your computer. Windows launches automatically and displays the lock screen.

  • 4.jpg Press any key or move your mouse to display the sign-in screen.

  • 5.jpg Enter your password (if necessary), and then press the Enter key on your keyboard.

Turn Off Your Computer

How you turn off your PC depends on what type of computer you have. If you have a notebook or tablet model, you can press the unit’s power (on/off) button—although that typically will put your PC into Sleep mode, not turn it all the way off. The better approach is to shut down your system through Windows.

  • 1.jpg Click the Start button at the far left side of the taskbar to display the Start menu.
  • 2.jpg Click Power to display the submenu of options.
  • 3.jpg Click Shut Down.

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